Modern technology gives us many things.

About 155,000 people enslaved in SA

Rosani Ghani, chair of the integrated anti-money laundering working group in South Africa, explained how they pursue human traffickers, following in their footsteps.

The Integrated Anti-Money Laundering Working Group in South Africa is a public-private partnership between the government and the South African banking sector, established in December 2019.

The working group also conducts research on a specific type of financial crime, identifies key markers, trends, typologies, modus operandi and provides solutions for both the banking sector and law enforcement on the spread of financial crime, how to identify such illegal activity through financial activity data and how best to combat such crimes.

It was set up by our financial intelligence center in South Africa, with the support of the National Treasury and the South African Reserve Bank. It must bridge the gap between the public and private sectors.

Rosana Ghani, Chair – Integrated Working Group on Anti-Money Laundering in South Africa

The ultimate goal of the South African Integrated Working Group on Money Laundering is to strengthen cooperation between the banking sector and law enforcement so that we can work together effectively and efficiently.

Rosana Ghani, Chair – Integrated Working Group on Anti-Money Laundering in South Africa

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Rosan Ghani, chair of the integrated anti-money laundering working group in South Africa, explained how the organization identifies human trafficking through the financial sector.

The financial sector plays a key role when traffickers use the formal banking sector to transfer and praise illicit profits. The banking and monetary services business has access to financial data that we can use to identify suspicious behavior and transactional activity and then provide evidence to prosecute the perpetrators.

Rosana Ghani, Chair – Integrated Working Group on Anti-Money Laundering in South Africa

We need to be able to build our red flags to monitor and monitor the work of an appropriate agency so that by sharing information we can identify specific lists of suspected traffickers, crime-related organizations, and so on. we are starting to build this information base, which we will eventually bring to the key perpetrators.

Rosana Ghani, Chair – Integrated Working Group on Anti-Money Laundering in South Africa

Ghani says South Africa has 155,000 trafficked citizens, 55.5% women and 44.5% men between the ages of 12 and 25.

Listen to the full interview below …


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